Oscar Raby is a multimedia artist exploring the overlaps between user and artefact to find the places where a story is built in present time.

Image of Oscar Raby

Oscar Raby is a multimedia artist exploring the overlaps between user and artefact to find the places where a story is built in present time.

In 2014, together with producer Katy Morrison, they started VRTOV, the Virtual Reality studio behind works Assent (Sheffield Doc/Fest 2014, Sundance 2015), The Turning Forest (BBC; Tribeca 2016), Easter Rising (BBC; FoST 2016, MIFF 2016),  A Thin Black Line (SBS; IDFA 2017) and The Unknown Patient (Venice Biennale 2018).

The Project

Oscar will undertake intensive creative research on the illusion of control as a way to access a character’s story in interactive Virtual Reality. This practise-based experimentation will be developed by charting the discontinuities between screen performance and game mechanics, informed by dialogue with experts in acting techniques and interactive narratives. The outcomes will contribute creative background for a future work tentatively titled NPC, Non-Playable Character.

Twitter: @oscar_raby


What does being awarded a Creators Fund grant mean to you?

As an immigrant, being able to establish my own creative practice in Victoria, starting a studio and in doing so also generating new jobs for local artists has been greatly rewarding in both my professional and personal development. I see the Creators Fund grant, coming from the hands of peers, as the welcome sign of a community which I’m very proud to be a part of. 

How important is 'time' to you, as an artist/creative professional?

They say time is money, yes, but time is time first. The time when I wake up, eat, dance with my daughter, walk with my wife, sit down and stare at the screen, put on a headset, draw a sunset mid-air in the middle of the studio, go to sleep, dream. Throughout these times I don’t stop working, as the observation of my own actions is central to the work I do: time is indeed a currency I trade with myself. 

What are you most looking forward to over the months ahead?

I’m looking forward to not having to shoo away the tendrils of financial stress that seep into the creative process of every indie new media project. Other concerns will be most welcome, it wouldn’t be an indie new media project if it wasn’t built on the shaky grounds of language, form and technique, but for the first time in a while, the market suitability of the endeavour will not be brought up when thinking about how this work comes into being.  

Where would like to see yourself at the end of this process? How do you anticipate your career will develop as a result?

At the end of the process I’d like to be very confused in my head and incredibly busy with my hands. As a result, I expect to have some new art to show.