• arts & culture
  • music
  • screen
  • design
  • fashion

30 January 2019

Victorian pop icons, filmmakers, philanthropists, arts groundbreakers and more have been recognised in this year’s Australia Day honour roll.

Australia Day

Philanthropist Pauline Gandel was recognised for service to the community. Photo: Daniel Mahon

Congratulations to the many Victorian born and based honourees who have made a significant contribution to the creative industries both in front and behind the scenes.

Companion AC in the General Division of the Order of Australia

  • Olivia Newton-John for eminent service to community health, particularly for people living with cancer, through support for medical research, and as a songwriter and performer.
  • Pauline Gandel for eminent service to the community through humanitarian, philanthropic and fundraising endeavours, to social inclusion and to Australia-Japan relations. (As an example of her contribution, see recent announcement of the Pauline Gandel Children’s Quarter at State Library of Victoria)
  • Carrillo Gantner for eminent service to the community through professional involvement in, and philanthropic support for, the performing and visual arts, and to the Australia-Asia cultural exchange.

Officer of the Order of Australia (AO):

  • University of Melbourne Vice-Chancellor’s Fellow, Professor Daryl Le Grew, for distinguished service to education, research infrastructure development, and to architecture.
  • Sue Maslin was recognised for her distinguished service to the Australian film industry as a producer, and through roles with professional bodies.
  • Kylie Minogue was honoured for her distinguished service to the performing arts as a national and international recording artist and entertainer.
  • Comedian Magda Szubanski was recognised for distinguished service to the performing arts as an actor, comedian and writer, and as a campaigner for marriage equality, and
  • Michael Ullmer for distinguished service to the performing and visual arts through a range of roles, and to the finance and banking industry.

Member of the Order of Australia (AM): 

  • Dr Cindy ‘Lou’ Bennett for significant service to the performing arts, particularly to music, and to the indigenous community.
  • Deborah Beale for significant service to the business and public sectors, and to the community of Victoria including as board member of arts and cultural organisations such as The Production Company and as the Chair of Federation Square.
  • Sally Browne for significant service to the community through charitable organisations, and to the fashion industry.
  • Timothy Coldwell for significant service to the circus arts as a performer, designer, director and administrator.
  • Jeffrey Davies for significant service to the visual arts as an ornithological artist and illustrator.
  • Dennis Goldner for significant service to the community through charitable, health and cultural organisations
  • Professor John Griffiths for significant service to music education as an academic and musicologist, and to professional societies.
  • Sue Giles for her contribution to the performing arts as an artistic director and to children’s theatre.
  • Alison Lester for significant service to literature as a children’s author and illustrator, and to indigenous literacy.
  • Helen Marcou for significant service to music, particularly as a promoter and advocate for live performance.
  • Ian ‘Quincy’ McLean for significant service to music, particularly as a promoter and advocate for live performance.
  • Geoffrey Todd for significant service to the visual arts as an artist and sculptor.
  • Professor Karen Quinlan for significant service to the visual arts as an administrator and gallery curator, and to higher education.

Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM): 

  • Claudia Barker for service to the community through a range of musical organisations.
  • Susan Bergman for service to the performing arts, particularly through community theatre.
  • Betty Cummings for service to music through community programs.
  • Coral Deague for service to dance as a choreographer and teacher.
  • Lauraine Diggins for service to the museums and galleries sector.
  • Dorothy Hamilton for service to music, and to people who are blind or have low visions.
  • Donald Hossack for service to medicine, and to the arts.
  • Bronwyn Hughes for service to the visual arts.
  • Adrian Jackson for service to the performing arts, particularly through music.
  • Barbara O’Leary for service to choral music.
  • Eileen O’Shea for service to the media and entertainment sectors.
  • Mandar Vaidya for service to the performing arts.
  • Ian Watts for service to the museums and galleries sector.
  • Graeme Williams for service to the visual arts.

Congratulations also go to Darwin-born, Melbourne-based rapper, dancer, actor and artist, Danzal Baker AKA ‘Baker Boy'; who was named this year’s Young Australian of the Year. Baker, who raps in Yolngu Matha language is the first Indigenous artist to achieve mainstream success including when his 2017 single ‘Marryuna’ was voted in the top 20 of Triple J's Hottest 100 for 2017. He was recognised for his talent and career success to date, and for his leadership in working to inspire young people in remote Indigenous communities to embrace their culture and become leaders of the next generation.